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Top 10 collaborative tools

Gigabit looks at some of the best, and most popular, collaborative tools designed to enhance productivity.

10 | LoopUp

LoopUp

Taking a ‘less is more’ approach with a minimalist interface, UK company LoopUp pride itself on delivering a reliable and high-quality conference calling and remote-meeting experience. The company was established in 2003 by cofounders and co-CEOs Steve Flavell and Michael Hughes. Over 2,000 businesses worldwide including Travelex, National Geographic, and car makers Kia and Subaru, use LoopUp for their remote meetings.

9 | Wrike

Wrike

Wrike has been included on Deloitte’s Fast500 list for the past three consecutive years. With over 15,000 customers, it has long passed the million users mark. Some notable clients are Airbnb and Hootsuite. Wrike includes features such as creating tasks, assigning them and ordering them by priority, creating timelines for projects, tracking time and creating partial or full reports.

8 | Cisco Webex

Cisco Webex

Cisco recently refreshed its Webex brand to offer new features in an effort to completely transform team collaboration. Currently, more than 6bn minutes’ worth of meetings happen in Webex every month. Cisco has created a simple, but incredible technology for all teams to, in their own words, ‘start a new journey that puts artificial intelligence at the heart of the workplace’. Webex is used by the likes of Microsoft and Google.

7 | BlueJeans

BlueJeans

BlueJeans is a cloud video meeting company whose customers include Facebook, Netflix and LinkedIn. Thousands of companies from growing businesses to Fortune 500 leaders use BlueJeans every day for video, audio and web conferencing meetings and large interactive events, so people can work productively where, and how, they want.

6 | Zoom

Zoom

Operating out of California, Zoom is currently one of the top video communications companies in the US with plans to expand. 2018 is set to be a busy year for video conferencing companies as businesses begin to ramp up their offering and enhance capability including AI-based features such as voice-to-text transcription for take meeting notes, virtual personal assistants to record tasks and help set up meetings, and voice recognition to identify who is speaking.

5 | Trello

Trello

By September last year Trello passed the 25mn user mark. Led by CEO, Michael Pryor, Trello is a web-based project management application originally launched in 2011. It works almost like a digital note board that can be accessed from any device and used by various team members at any one time to chart the progress of a particular project or work stream.

4 | Slack

Slack

Since launching in 2013, the US company now has around 6mn daily users and 2mn paid accounts, with an average of 320 minutes being spent on the tool by its users during the week. Something of an alternative to email, Slack brings team collaboration and communication into one place and works on any device which makes it particularly appealing to an agile, flexible workforce.

3 | Asana

Asana

Asana is a web and mobile application designed to help teams collaborate and track their work. The business was set up by Facebook cofounder Dustin Moskovitz and ex-engineer, Justin Rosenstein in 2008. Asana has previously announced that it has over 15,000 organisations using its software and more than 140,000 teams. The company was valued at $600mn last year.

2 | Skype

Skype

Already a household name thanks to its ability to connect people on a global scale, Skype also offers plenty of benefits from a business point of view. It arguably has the advantage of being familiar so therefore requires much less time to set up and learn. It’s thought somewhere in the region of 300mn monthly active users spend 3bn minutes a day on the platform. Microsoft purchased Skype for $8.5bn in 2011.

1 | Evernote

Evernote

Evernote remains a popular option as a collaborative tool for teams trying to enhance their productivity. Evernote allows its users to do everything from scan business cards, use it as an email inbox, take notes and much more. It also has around 200mn users, supports 25 different languages and the business is thought to have raised around $205mn in funding.

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10 | LoopUp

LoopUp

Taking a ‘less is more’ approach with a minimalist interface, UK company LoopUp pride itself on delivering a reliable and high-quality conference calling and remote-meeting experience. The company was established in 2003 by cofounders and co-CEOs Steve Flavell and Michael Hughes. Over 2,000 businesses worldwide including Travelex, National Geographic, and car makers Kia and Subaru, use LoopUp for their remote meetings.

9 | Wrike

Wrike

Wrike has been included on Deloitte’s Fast500 list for the past three consecutive years. With over 15,000 customers, it has long passed the million users mark. Some notable clients are Airbnb and Hootsuite. Wrike includes features such as creating tasks, assigning them and ordering them by priority, creating timelines for projects, tracking time and creating partial or full reports.

8 | Cisco Webex

Cisco Webex

Cisco recently refreshed its Webex brand to offer new features in an effort to completely transform team collaboration. Currently, more than 6bn minutes’ worth of meetings happen in Webex every month. Cisco has created a simple, but incredible technology for all teams to, in their own words, ‘start a new journey that puts artificial intelligence at the heart of the workplace’. Webex is used by the likes of Microsoft and Google.

7 | BlueJeans

BlueJeans

BlueJeans is a cloud video meeting company whose customers include Facebook, Netflix and LinkedIn. Thousands of companies from growing businesses to Fortune 500 leaders use BlueJeans every day for video, audio and web conferencing meetings and large interactive events, so people can work productively where, and how, they want.

6 | Zoom

Zoom

Operating out of California, Zoom is currently one of the top video communications companies in the US with plans to expand. 2018 is set to be a busy year for video conferencing companies as businesses begin to ramp up their offering and enhance capability including AI-based features such as voice-to-text transcription for take meeting notes, virtual personal assistants to record tasks and help set up meetings, and voice recognition to identify who is speaking.

5 | Trello

Trello

By September last year Trello passed the 25mn user mark. Led by CEO, Michael Pryor, Trello is a web-based project management application originally launched in 2011. It works almost like a digital note board that can be accessed from any device and used by various team members at any one time to chart the progress of a particular project or work stream.

4 | Slack

Slack

Since launching in 2013, the US company now has around 6mn daily users and 2mn paid accounts, with an average of 320 minutes being spent on the tool by its users during the week. Something of an alternative to email, Slack brings team collaboration and communication into one place and works on any device which makes it particularly appealing to an agile, flexible workforce.

3 | Asana

Asana

Asana is a web and mobile application designed to help teams collaborate and track their work. The business was set up by Facebook cofounder Dustin Moskovitz and ex-engineer, Justin Rosenstein in 2008. Asana has previously announced that it has over 15,000 organisations using its software and more than 140,000 teams. The company was valued at $600mn last year.

2 | Skype

Skype

Already a household name thanks to its ability to connect people on a global scale, Skype also offers plenty of benefits from a business point of view. It arguably has the advantage of being familiar so therefore requires much less time to set up and learn. It’s thought somewhere in the region of 300mn monthly active users spend 3bn minutes a day on the platform. Microsoft purchased Skype for $8.5bn in 2011.

1 | Evernote

Evernote

Evernote remains a popular option as a collaborative tool for teams trying to enhance their productivity. Evernote allows its users to do everything from scan business cards, use it as an email inbox, take notes and much more. It also has around 200mn users, supports 25 different languages and the business is thought to have raised around $205mn in funding.

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