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Top 10 RPA Companies

Gigabit magazine takes a look at the world’s top robotic process automation (RPA) companies and the products heralding a new age of digital workers.

10 | Another Monday

Germany’s Another Monday adopts a musical theme for its RPA solution suite, AM Ensemble, with its Muse, Composer and Conductor tools guiding the creation and implementation of RPA. Highlighting the simultaneous importance and tedium of repetitive processes, Another Monday positions its software robots as the solution. Able to mimic the inputs of a worker and integrate with existing software, Another Monday also suggests an attendant benefit of freeing employees up to perform more rewarding tasks.

9 | EdgeVerve

A subsidiary of Indian multinational Infosys, EdgeVerve was founded in 2014 with a focus on enterprise. Having absorbed Infosys’ banking solution FInacle in 2015, the company offers that suite alongside its AssistEdge automation platform which features an end-to-end RPA service. The company lays out the progression of RPA as ending in “Human-empowered Automation” – a seamless interaction of human and digital workers. Retainers of its services have included Vodafone New Zealand and Curtin University.

8 | WorkFusion

Emphasising the intelligent side of its RPA capabilities, WorkFusion differentiates itself from competitors with rapid deployment within 12 weeks. Highlighting its solution’s intelligence, simplicity and scalability, WorkFusion’s Intelligent Automation Cloud ecosystem comes in business and enterprise tiers, as well as a free express version for personal automation projects. Customers include Capgemini, Deloitte, Tata and Infosys. A relative newcomer, having been founded in 2010, WorkFusion has raised over $120mn from six funding rounds.

7 | Pegasystems

Pegasystems specialises in customer relationship management software. The company’s automation offerings are built around its Pega Platform, which allows for the creation of apps without code. To maximise the impact of its RPA features, Pegasystems’ Opportunity Finder utilises machine learning to find areas optimal for automation. Founder and CEO Alan Trefler first gained fame as a chess master, later using his expertise in the game to develop chess playing computers before founding the firm in 1983.

6 | Automation Anywhere

Automation Anywhere operates a Bot Store – a marketplace for pre-existent bots suited for different roles. These so-called “Digital Workers” are given job titles by the company, such as the “Digital Employee Onboarding Specialist” which can identify, shortlist and onboard candidates. Also on offer are bots suited to specific tasks such as autonomously converting text to speech. Originally founded in 2003 as Tethys Solutions, the company acquired its current name in 2010, emphasising its focus on robotic process automation.

5 | Blue Prism

The UK’s Blue Prism counts the likes of Ebay, the NHS and Walgreens among its customers. Its intelligent RPA platform comes in both on-premise and SaaS varieties, and it identifies industries such as the public sector, manufacturing and financial services as ripe for RPA implementation. Blue Prism maintains a drag-and-drop interface built around connectable objects containing actions and events, with the processes created leaving a detailed, auditable trail. The company is relatively ancient in RPA terms, having been founded in 2001.

4 | UiPath

UiPath is an RPA specialist, offering a platform for automating repetitive manual tasks, which the company claims represents the future of work. Advertising the ease of use for its automation designer, UiPath’s robots are able to operate in both attended situations, such as help desks and call centers in collaboration with humans, and unattended situations. Though now based in New York, the company was founded in Bucharest, Romania, in 2005. Reflecting the increasingly important status of RPA, the company raised $568mn in its latest Series D funding round.

3 | SAP

‘Intelligent Robotic Process Automation’ from SAP come as part of its SAP Leonardo intelligent enterprise system. It emphasises its capability to mimic human workers inputs as well as interpret their communications. SAP’s offering incorporates machine learning and conversational AI alongside RPA. Its bots also have the capability to build intelligence into existing back office processes. SAP was founded in 1972 by five German engineers from the next company on this list, IBM.

2 | IBM

IBM sees the implementation of intelligent automation as heralding a future ‘collaborative workforce’ comprised of humans and machines working together. It advocates for a programme of change management to upskill workers with the ability to collaborate with robots. The company’s suite of intelligent automation services includes its Watson system, and its technologies have already been put to use in banking, shipping and in policing. The grandfather of the IT industry, IBM can trace its history back over 100 years.

1 | Cognizant

Cognizant

Cognizant advertises the platform-agnostic nature of its automation offerings, which can ‘harmonise’ with legacy systems. The company identifies automation potential in tasks across the business operation, which it says its machine learning augmented robotic process automation can provide. Cognizant offers so-called ‘Robotics-as-a-Service’ systems which can free human workers up to pursue less menial tasks in sectors such as insurance, banking, healthcare, manufacturing and more. The company was founded in 1994, spun out of business information company Dun & Bradstreet.

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10 | Another Monday

Germany’s Another Monday adopts a musical theme for its RPA solution suite, AM Ensemble, with its Muse, Composer and Conductor tools guiding the creation and implementation of RPA. Highlighting the simultaneous importance and tedium of repetitive processes, Another Monday positions its software robots as the solution. Able to mimic the inputs of a worker and integrate with existing software, Another Monday also suggests an attendant benefit of freeing employees up to perform more rewarding tasks.

9 | EdgeVerve

A subsidiary of Indian multinational Infosys, EdgeVerve was founded in 2014 with a focus on enterprise. Having absorbed Infosys’ banking solution FInacle in 2015, the company offers that suite alongside its AssistEdge automation platform which features an end-to-end RPA service. The company lays out the progression of RPA as ending in “Human-empowered Automation” – a seamless interaction of human and digital workers. Retainers of its services have included Vodafone New Zealand and Curtin University.

8 | WorkFusion

Emphasising the intelligent side of its RPA capabilities, WorkFusion differentiates itself from competitors with rapid deployment within 12 weeks. Highlighting its solution’s intelligence, simplicity and scalability, WorkFusion’s Intelligent Automation Cloud ecosystem comes in business and enterprise tiers, as well as a free express version for personal automation projects. Customers include Capgemini, Deloitte, Tata and Infosys. A relative newcomer, having been founded in 2010, WorkFusion has raised over $120mn from six funding rounds.

7 | Pegasystems

Pegasystems specialises in customer relationship management software. The company’s automation offerings are built around its Pega Platform, which allows for the creation of apps without code. To maximise the impact of its RPA features, Pegasystems’ Opportunity Finder utilises machine learning to find areas optimal for automation. Founder and CEO Alan Trefler first gained fame as a chess master, later using his expertise in the game to develop chess playing computers before founding the firm in 1983.

6 | Automation Anywhere

Automation Anywhere operates a Bot Store – a marketplace for pre-existent bots suited for different roles. These so-called “Digital Workers” are given job titles by the company, such as the “Digital Employee Onboarding Specialist” which can identify, shortlist and onboard candidates. Also on offer are bots suited to specific tasks such as autonomously converting text to speech. Originally founded in 2003 as Tethys Solutions, the company acquired its current name in 2010, emphasising its focus on robotic process automation.

5 | Blue Prism

The UK’s Blue Prism counts the likes of Ebay, the NHS and Walgreens among its customers. Its intelligent RPA platform comes in both on-premise and SaaS varieties, and it identifies industries such as the public sector, manufacturing and financial services as ripe for RPA implementation. Blue Prism maintains a drag-and-drop interface built around connectable objects containing actions and events, with the processes created leaving a detailed, auditable trail. The company is relatively ancient in RPA terms, having been founded in 2001.

4 | UiPath

UiPath is an RPA specialist, offering a platform for automating repetitive manual tasks, which the company claims represents the future of work. Advertising the ease of use for its automation designer, UiPath’s robots are able to operate in both attended situations, such as help desks and call centers in collaboration with humans, and unattended situations. Though now based in New York, the company was founded in Bucharest, Romania, in 2005. Reflecting the increasingly important status of RPA, the company raised $568mn in its latest Series D funding round.

3 | SAP

‘Intelligent Robotic Process Automation’ from SAP come as part of its SAP Leonardo intelligent enterprise system. It emphasises its capability to mimic human workers inputs as well as interpret their communications. SAP’s offering incorporates machine learning and conversational AI alongside RPA. Its bots also have the capability to build intelligence into existing back office processes. SAP was founded in 1972 by five German engineers from the next company on this list, IBM.

2 | IBM

IBM sees the implementation of intelligent automation as heralding a future ‘collaborative workforce’ comprised of humans and machines working together. It advocates for a programme of change management to upskill workers with the ability to collaborate with robots. The company’s suite of intelligent automation services includes its Watson system, and its technologies have already been put to use in banking, shipping and in policing. The grandfather of the IT industry, IBM can trace its history back over 100 years.

1 | Cognizant

Cognizant

Cognizant advertises the platform-agnostic nature of its automation offerings, which can ‘harmonise’ with legacy systems. The company identifies automation potential in tasks across the business operation, which it says its machine learning augmented robotic process automation can provide. Cognizant offers so-called ‘Robotics-as-a-Service’ systems which can free human workers up to pursue less menial tasks in sectors such as insurance, banking, healthcare, manufacturing and more. The company was founded in 1994, spun out of business information company Dun & Bradstreet.

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